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Committed to Helping You Find Assistance Options for Avastin

There may be options to help you afford your Avastin, no matter what type of health insurance you have.

Use our Patient Assistance Tool to find out which assistance option might be right for you.

  • Do you have health insurance?

  • Does your health insurance cover your Genentech medicine?

  • Do you have commercial health insurance?

  • Are you already getting financial assistance to help pay for your medicine?

  • Are you 18 years of age or older?

You Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program

If you have commercial health insurance, Avastin Access Solutions can refer you to the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program. It can help you with the out-of-pocket costs of your Genentech medicine, if you’re eligible.*

 

Learn More

 

*Eligibility criteria apply. Not valid for patients using federal or state government programs to pay for their medications and or administration of their Genentech medication. Patient must be taking the Genentech medication for an FDA-approved indication. See full Terms and Conditions at CopayAssistanceNow.com.

You Might Qualify for a Referral to an Independent Co-pay Assistance Foundation

If you need help with your co-pay for your Genentech medicine, we can refer you to an independent co-pay assistance foundation.*

 

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*These organizations are independent of Genentech and may require you to provide personal or financial information to enroll in their programs. Genentech cannot share any information you have provided to us.

Independent co-pay assistance foundations have their own rules for eligibility. We have no involvement or influence in independent foundation decision-making or eligibility criteria and do not know if a foundation will be able to help you. We can only refer you to a foundation that supports your disease state. This information is provided as a resource for you. We do not endorse or show preference for any particular foundation. The foundations in this list may not be the only ones that might be able to help you.

You Might Qualify for a Referral to the Genentech Patient Foundation

The Genentech Patient Foundation provides free Genentech medicine to people who don't have insurance coverage or who have financial concerns and meet eligibility criteria.*

 

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*If you have health insurance, you should try to get other types of financial assistance, if available. You also need to meet income requirements. If you do not have insurance, or if your insurance does not cover your Genentech medicine, you must meet a different set of income requirements.

Genentech BioOncologyTM Co-pay Card

The Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program*

The Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program helps people with commercial health insurance. This might be a plan you get through your employer or one you purchased through a Health Insurance Marketplace like HealthCare.gov. To qualify, you must also meet other criteria. Please see full terms and conditions below.

Avastin Access Solutions logo

Independent Co-pay Assistance Foundations

If you need help with the co-pay for your Genentech medicine, Genentech Oncology Access Solutions for Avastin can refer you to an independent co-pay assistance foundation. Independent co-pay assistance foundations help patients with public or commercial health insurance.

Genentech Patient Foundation icon

Genentech Patient Foundation

The Genentech Patient Foundation gives free Avastin to people who don’t have insurance coverage or who have financial concerns.

Genentech Oncology Access Solutions is a program that helps people who are taking a Genentech medicine. Your health insurance plan and the cost of your medicine might keep you from getting your medicine. We may be able to help. Learn how we help.

Our Patient Assistance Tool helps you find out which of our patient assistance options may be right for you. Answer a few questions to learn which options you might qualify for.

With some programs, you might have to state your household income. You can learn more about each option and its criteria at Genentech-Access.com/Avastin

For Genentech Oncology Access Solutions to help you, you must complete and submit the Patient Consent Form. Your doctor must also complete a form called the Prescriber Service Form. Once we have both forms, we can begin working with you and your doctor's office. You can find the Patient Consent Form at Genentech-Access.com/PatientConsent or your doctor might give it to you.

Each program has its own time period for you to receive assistance. You can call us at (866) 422-2377 for more information.

To learn how we can help:

*This Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program is valid ONLY for patients with commercial insurance who have a valid prescription for a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved indication of a Genentech medication. Patients using Medicare, Medicaid or any other federal or state government program to pay for their medications are not eligible.

Under the program, the patient will pay a co-pay. After reaching the maximum program benefit, the patient will be responsible for all remaining out-of-pocket expenses. The amount of the program benefit cannot exceed the patients’ out-of-pocket expenses for the cost associated with Avastin.

All participants are responsible for reporting the receipt of all program benefits as required by any insurer or by law. No party may seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received through this Program. The program is only valid in the United States and U.S. Territories. This program is void where prohibited by law and shall follow state restrictions in relation to AB-rated generic equivalents (e.g., MA, CA) where applicable. The patient, guardian, prescriber, hospital and any other person using the program agree not to seek reimbursement for all or any part of the benefit received by the patient through the offer of this program. Genentech reserves the right to rescind, revoke or amend the program without notice at any time. Additional terms and conditions apply. Please visit here for the full list of Terms and Conditions.

†Independent co-pay assistance foundations have their own rules for eligibility. We cannot guarantee a foundation will help you. We only can refer you to a foundation that supports your disease state. We do not endorse or show financial preference for any particular foundation. The foundations we refer you to are not the only ones that might be able to help you.

To be eligible for free Avastin from the Genentech Patient Foundation, insured patients who have coverage for their medicine must have exhausted all other forms of patient assistance (including the Genentech Oncology Co-pay Assistance Program and support from independent co-pay assistance foundations) and must meet certain financial criteria. Uninsured patients and insured patients without coverage for their medicine must meet different financial criteria.

Indication

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (mCRC)

Avastin is approved to treat metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) for:

  • First- or second-line treatment in combination with intravenous fluorouracil–based chemotherapy
  • Second-line treatment when used with fluoropyrimidine-based (combined with irinotecan or oxaliplatin) chemotherapy after cancer progresses following a first-line treatment that includes Avastin

Avastin is not approved for use after surgery was used as the primary treatment in patients with colon cancer which has not spread to other parts of the body.

Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer (nsNSCLC)

Avastin, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, is approved to treat advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in people who have not received chemotherapy for their advanced disease.

Glioblastoma (GBM)

Avastin is approved to treat glioblastoma (GBM) in adult patients whose cancer has progressed after prior treatment (recurrent or rGBM).

Metastatic Kidney Cancer (mRCC)

Avastin, used with interferon alfa, is approved to treat metastatic kidney cancer (mRCC).

Advanced Cervical Cancer (CC)

Avastin, in combination with paclitaxel and cisplatin or paclitaxel and topotecan, is approved to treat persistent, recurrent, or metastatic cancer of the cervix.

Ovarian Cancer (OC)

Avastin, in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel, followed by Avastin alone, is used for the treatment of patients with advanced (Stage III or IV) epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer following initial surgery.
Avastin, in combination with paclitaxel, pegylated liposomal doxorubicin or topotecan, is approved to treat platinum-resistant recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal cancer (prOC) in women who received no more than two prior chemotherapy treatments.
Avastin, either in combination with carboplatin and paclitaxel or with carboplatin and gemcitabine, followed by Avastin alone, is approved for the treatment of patients with platinum-sensitive recurrent epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer (psOC).

Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

Avastin, in combination with atezolizumab, is indicated for the treatment of patients with unresectable or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have not received prior systemic therapy.

Possible serious side effects

Everyone reacts differently to Avastin therapy. So, it's important to know what the side effects are. Although some people may have a life-threatening side effect, most do not. Your doctor will stop treatment if any serious side effects occur. Be sure to contact your health care team if there are any signs of these side effects.

  • GI perforation. A hole that develops in your stomach or intestine. Symptoms include pain in your abdomen, nausea, vomiting, constipation, or fever
  • Abnormal passage in the body. This type of passage—known as a fistula—is an irregular connection from one part of the body to another and can sometimes be fatal
  • Wounds that don't heal. A cut made during surgery can be slow to heal or may not fully heal. Avastin should not be used for at least 28 days before or after surgery and until surgical wounds are fully healed
  • Serious bleeding. This includes vomiting or coughing up blood; bleeding in the stomach, brain, or spinal cord; nosebleeds; and vaginal bleeding. If you recently coughed up blood or had serious bleeding, be sure to tell your doctor
  • Severe high blood pressure. Blood pressure that severely spikes or shows signs of affecting the brain. Blood pressure should be monitored every 2 to 3 weeks while on Avastin and after stopping treatment
  • Kidney problems. These may be caused by too much protein in the urine and can sometimes be fatal
  • Infusion-related reactions. These were uncommon with the first dose (less than 3% of patients). 0.4% of patients had severe reactions. Infusion-related reactions include high blood pressure or severe high blood pressure that may lead to stroke, trouble breathing, decreased oxygen in red blood cells, a serious allergic reaction, chest pain, headache, tremors, and excessive sweating. Your doctor or nurse will monitor you for signs of infusion-related reactions
  • Severe stroke or heart problems. These may include blood clots, mini-stroke, heart attack, chest pain, and your heart may become too weak to pump blood to other parts of your body (congestive heart failure). These can sometimes be fatal
  • Nervous system and vision problems. Signs include headache, seizure, high blood pressure, sluggishness, confusion, and blindness

Side effects seen most often

In clinical studies across different types of cancer, some patients experienced the following side effects:

  • High blood pressure
  • Too much protein in the urine
  • Nosebleeds
  • Bleeding
  • Back pain
  • Headache
  • Taste change
  • Dry skin
  • Inflammation of the skin
  • Inflammation of the nose
  • Watery eyes

Avastin is not for everyone

Talk to your doctor if you are:

  • Undergoing surgery. Avastin should not be used for 28 days before or after surgery and until surgical wounds are fully healed
  • Pregnant or think you are pregnant. Data have shown that Avastin may harm your unborn baby. Use birth control while on Avastin. If you stop Avastin, you should keep using birth control for 6 months before trying to become pregnant
  • Planning to become pregnant. Taking Avastin could cause a woman’s ovaries to stop working and may impair her ability to have children
  • Breastfeeding. Breastfeeding while on Avastin may harm your baby, therefore, women should not breastfeed during and for 6 months after taking Avastin

For more information about your treatment or condition, talk to your doctor.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch. You may also report side effects to Genentech at 1-888-835-2555.

Please see full Product Information for additional important safety information.